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Can you see me is a two-minute video and sound that address the redaction of Native American people and communities from American institutions and the consciousness of American citizens. 

The video is audio and video interviews with members of the Yavapai-Apache Nation, Washo, and Fort Belnap tribes. That provides a glimpse into the complexity and challenge of sustaining Native American and community self-determination within a Westernized nation driven by perpetual economic growth and the desire to transform Indigenous land into economic and military infrastructure.

 

The soundscape and image of the video are of re-mixed social dance songs and community stories mediated by dictation software. Just as the material of paved roads obscures community bodies, the mediated sound obscures their voices. 

The combination of images and sound poses a serious question. Who is speaking on behalf of Native American communities, and who is listening?

 

Collectively the work communicates the literal and metaphoric layers of American history, economic expansion, and development that have intersected and often buried obscured, and silenced the voices, lives, experiences, and cultures of Native communities and people.

Can you see me is a two-minute video and sound that address the redaction of Native American people and communities from American institutions and the consciousness of American citizens. 

The video is audio and video interviews with members of the Yavapai-Apache Nation, Washo, and Hopi tribes. That provides a glimpse into the complexity and challenge of sustaining Native American and community self-determination within a Westernized nation driven by perpetual economic growth and the desire to transform Indigenous land into economic and military infrastructure.

 

The soundscape and image of the video are of re-mixed social dance songs and community stories mediated by dictation software. Just as the material of paved roads obscures community bodies, the mediated sound obscures their voices. 

The combination of images and sound poses a serious question. Who is speaking on behalf of Native American communities, and who is listening?

 

Collectively the work communicates the literal and metaphoric layers of American history, economic expansion, and development that have intersected and often buried obscured, and silenced the voices, lives, experiences, and cultures of Native communities and people.